Find More over at PLoS!

Lots of great stuff happening at our new home: Neuroanthropology PLoS

For those of you who haven’t updated the rss feed yet, here is our new PLoS feed. Or the actual html: http://feeds.plos.org/plos/blogs/neuroanthropology Please update! We miss you!!

Recent Popular Posts

Daniel Hruschka and the Book of Friendship

Cordelia Fine and the Delusions of Gender

Fetal Origins: In the News, In the Womb

National Research Council Rankings: Anthropology

Terry Deacon, Relaxed Selection, and the Evolution of Language

Other Posts

Latest Wednesday Round-Up

Ellen Langer and the Psychology of Possibility

Anthropologist Shannon Lee Dawdy – 2010 MacArthur Fellow!

Linguist Jessie Little Doe Baird – 2010 MacArthur Fellow!

Context and Variation: Kathryn Clancy

The Machine That Teaches Itself… Kinda

Peter Kalivas on Learning, Memory and Addiction

Daniel Lende on Twitter

I’ve joined Twitter. You can find me @daniel_lende. Or just click on daniel_lende to see all my latest tweets.

Besides tweeting about the latest posts on Neuroanthropology/PLoS, I do the typical re-tweets, life commentary, exciting links, and the like. So I hope to see you over there!

And if you haven’t updated your feed yet for Neuroanthropology on PLoS, here’s the link to do that right now! Thanks.

The Latest on PLoS Neuroanthropology

We moved over to the Public Library of Science on September 1st, and so far it has gone well. However, I was just looking at Google Reader, and saw that not everyone had updated their subscription! So we are now at: http://blogs.plos.org/neuroanthropology/

Here are some highlights from the past two weeks:

Addiction & Learning: More Than Glutamate and Dopamine – Building a better understanding of how learning and memory play a role in addiction

From Good Study Habits to Better Teaching – Taking what we have learned about how students learn more effectively and applying it to my teaching in the classroom

The Narcotic Farm & Nancy Campbell – The United States’ most infamous drug prison/research laboratory, complete with a video interview with the author who helped unearth the archives and photos that tell the story of this foundational institution for drug research and policy

2 legs good, 4 legs better: Uner Tan Syndrome, part 2 – Get your crazy videos of bipedal dogs and goats, as well as Greg’s continued in-depth examination of human bipedality and the fascinating case of “the family that walks on all fours”

You can also find these posts (and more besides!):

Daniel Lende: Projects on PLoS Neuroanthropology – what I am up to over there

Wednesday Round Up #120 – the latest one

Schizophrenia and Cross-Cultural Mental Illness and Treatment – online video and posts from the Foundation for Psychocultural Research

Gonorrhea and the Clap: The Slap Down Treatment – “This might not sound like a good treatment since it involved smashing the penis.”

Aboriginal affairs & pre-human morphing: quick links – See Greg as a Homo heidelbergensis

Over at PLoS: Humans as Quadrupeds!

Greg has a great post over at our new home, PLoS Neuroanthropology:

Human, quadruped: Uner Tan Syndrome, part 1

The photos that accompanied news releases about quadrupedal people living in Turkey, members of a family that allegedly could not walk except on hands and feet, looked staged when I first saw them. Three women and one man scrambling across rocky ground, the women in brightly coloured clothing, the sky radiant blue behind them, their eyes forward and backsides high in the air – like children engaged in some sort of awkward race at a field day or sporting carnival.

For an anthropologist interested in human motor variation and adaptation, the family looked too good to be true…


UPDATE (Greg added):

I’m grateful to Daniel for posting the link, but the first post was just the straight set-up for the much more Neuroanthropology-esque second part, in which we open the discussion to include Faith the walking dog, Slijper’s Goat, Johnny Eck the ‘Half Boy,’ capoeira practitioners who crawl around, and other intriguing examples of exotic locomotion including human quadrupedalism, animal bipedalism, and human handwalking. If you want to, skip the first part, and go straight to: 2 legs good, 4 legs better: Uner Tan Syndrome, part 2.

Neuroanthropology Is Moving to PLoS Blogs

Neuroanthropology is moving! We’re joining a new Public Library of Science project: PLoS Blogs. We’ll be part of a new cluster of eleven science blogs at PLoS.

You can now find us at PLoS Neuroanthropology. Please update your subscriptions, come over and comment (or complain), and let us know what you think.

We are tremendously excited about this opportunity for many more reasons than we have space to articulate. Here we’ll touch on some of the main ones.

The Network

We are thrilled to be part of an initiative that combines serious scholars and serious writers together. That first. As a group, we share interests in science and medicine, in the public uses and misuses of knowledge, and in promoting awareness of ideas and research in a broad fashion.

This amazing new network of people includes writers we’ve followed, others we’ve admired from afar, and some new names with impressive track records. A Pulitzer Prize winner, the former editor-in-chief of Scientific American, professors at Duke and North Carolina Central University, a range of award-wining science journalists, and some top-quality science bloggers with rigorous science backgrounds – that is a great group of people. We are particularly excited to learn from the writers how to better practice this craft, and to engage with people with such an array of interests.

Anthropology within the Public Library of Science

One of the things that has us most excited, that really clinched our decision to make the move to PLoS, is that we hope we might act as a voice for anthropology in a scholarly and public forum built around science and medicine. Anthropology offers powerful insights from cross-cultural research and sophisticated integrative theory that deserve a much wider audience, one we hope to help grow here at PLoS Blogs.

As research becomes increasingly international and interdisciplinary, researchers in all fields need to confront the complexities of worldwide variation and of cultural biases, including our own. Anthropology has done this work for over a century now, and is in a wonderful position to offer the fruits of these intellectual efforts, including hard won wisdom from our own field’s mistakes, to the work of science and medicine represented at PLoS.

PLoS and Blogs

As a non-profit, ad-free adventure, PLoS Blogs also suits what we’ve done long-term at Neuroanthropology. We’ve debated that topic several times, whether to go for ad revenue, whether to join a network that might pay us. We’ve always decided no. We didn’t start doing this for money, we haven’t kept at it for money. We do it because we enjoy writing and we like sharing our ideas with a broad public.

PLoS itself has taken bloggers seriously for quite some time. It offers bloggers access to preprint versions of articles on the same terms as journalists and organizations. The PLoS team has used its own weblogs – PLoS.org, everyONE and Speaking of Medicine – to highlight scholarly content in an accessible format. As Brian Mossop, PLoS Community Manager (and many thanks for the thrill of that initial call!), says, PLoS Blogs will open up “the discussion, and debate, on science and medicine.”

Although online discussions are no longer new to academia, many of us are searching for ways to better integrate online discussion with serious scholarship to increase the quality of the former and the vitality of the latter. We want PLoS blogs, and Neuroanthropology in particular, to be a place where readers can reliably turn to find a broad engagement with new research at the intersection of brain and culture.

The Principles behind PLoS

PLoS’s Core Principles – Open Access, Excellence, Integrity, Breadth, Cooperation, Community Engagement, Internationalism, and Science as a Public Resource – resonate deeply with us.

The Principles capture how we want science to be: open, international, and public. These values resonate with the ethics of anthropology, where integrity, breadth, and community engagement are core guiding principles for our research with people around the world. These values also correspond well with our home institutions, University of South Florida and Macquarie University, where top-notch science, interdisciplinary cooperation, public education, and community contribution are all fundamental to how these universities strive to conduct themselves.

What PLoS Does

There are also some selfish reasons to be part of PLoS. The Public Library of Science is a serious and powerful voice for open-access scholarship and education. We want Neuroanthropology to be a part of that.

PLoS One, the flagship interdisciplinary journal of PLoS, is soon to become the world’s largest journal, given how it is doubling in size every year.

The PLoS family extends to 1200 academic editors. In 2010 PLoS will publish roughly 8,000 articles, providing about 10% of new articles added to PubMedCentral and 1% of new articles added to PubMed.

At a time when scholars are widely discussing the potential of open access, PLoS is leading the charge to make new research accessible to scholars everywhere. To paraphrase a well-worn hacker’s aphorism: science wants to be free. We’d like to be part of letting it loose.

2.3 million page views per month. That’s what the PLoS sites average as a whole. If that’s not enough, PLoS emails Table of Content alerts to 100,000 readers on different weekly and monthly intervals. Its Twitter stream has 4300 followers; its Facebook group, 7000 fans. We’re both thrilled and humbled to be able to join such a vibrant community and will do everything in our power to return the trust.

Even though PLoS has been an innovator in the creation of the new Article Level Metrics Program, we know deans like their traditional journal impact factors right now. And here PLoS is strong. PLoS Biology has the highest impact factor in Biology, according to the Journal Citation Reports. PLoS Medicine is ranked sixth in Medicine, just after the major medical journals in the United States and Britain like the New England Journal of Medicine and Lancet.

Those are serious numbers in the impact game. The point is not simply that PLoS is successful, but that it’s changing the rules of that game. They’ve created this success using the power of online and open access and creating networks of scholars to ensure high quality.

PLoS Blogs and the Future

PLoS has revolutionized open-access, peer-reviewed scientific publishing since its founding in 2003. It opened up the world of academic publishing, making new research widely accessible regardless of whether a reader had access to a leading research library. We hope, and even believe, that blogs can go through a corresponding transformation, albeit in a different direction. Science blogging has different challenges and potentials for success.

Blogs have become an important channel for the popularization of science, often at an intermediate depth, between the level of the expert specialist and the most unfamiliar public or general readership. Because science blogs are so nimble, writers can respond quickly, posing questions, offering critiques, seeking connection and writing in open-ended fashion. We can comment as science stories unfold, responding both to the research and to popular versions, helping to highlight why findings are particularly interesting or exposing when someone’s over-reaching from the results.

For anthropologists, and for those interested in brain-culture relations, blogs are especially important because they provide a forum for synthetic work, a place where theorists and scientific analysts can try to draw conclusions from diverse sources and types of data. Although it may sound dry, the informal format can allow us to speculate and float ideas that might not yet be substantial enough to support a more traditional academic paper or book.

Finally, science blogs are fun, hopefully for the reader as much as the writer, as the rules for academic writing are relaxed and we can exercise our (sometimes warped) senses of humor. At Neuroanthropology, we like to think that anthropologists are particularly well suited for the role of online entertainment: nothing is quite as entertaining as the range of human oddity, including our own.

Recent controversies in the realm of for-profit science blogs and concerns about the business models for online publication suggest that, as with open-access publishing, a not-for-profit organization, founded on principles of community responsibility and accessibility, might offer the best way to bring together diverse talents.

We hope that PLoS can do for science blogging what it has done for academic journals, encouraging innovation and cooperation, offering an alternative model for supporting science, by people who are passionate about research.

Wednesday Round Up #118

Those of you looking for our weekly round up, you can now find it at PLoS Neuroanthropology – Wednesday Round Up #118.

That’s right – we’ve moved over to PLoS Blogs! Well, for the most part. Greg and I will be doing our main blogging over there now. More in just a bit about the move.

Here’s the link to our main Neuroanthropology page there. Please update your subscriptions. We really look forward to having you over there. This is a very exciting move for all of us.

Our Top 100 Posts

Here are our top 100 posts – 10% of our overall content, given that we just hit 1000 posts.  For the nitpickers, I included some of our pages in the actual list of posts.  So there’s more than 100 in the table.  But for actual posts, it is 100!

One note – the stats are based on on-site visits as registered by WordPress.  The syndicated views are a different story, but WordPress doesn’t make it easy to tabulate those.  But the #1 post based on both onsite and syndicated views looks to be Greg’s recent “We agree it’s WEIRD, but is it WEIRD enough?”

Title Views  
Cosleeping and Biological Imperatives: Why Human Babies Do Not and Should Not Sleep Alone 37,405
Lose your shoes: Is barefoot better? 14,103
What do these enigmatic women want? 12,185
Wednesday Round Up #47: Obama Is A Neuroanthropologist! 10,704
Grand Theft Auto: Liberty City 10,472
About Neuroanthropology 9,474
Cultural Aspects of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder 8,037
What’s the Dope on Music and Drugs? 7,100
The New Performance Enhancing Drugs 6,537
Be Afraid, America. Be Very Afraid: The Effect of Negative Media  6,507
Our Blessed Lady of the Cerebellum 6,489
Forever at War: Veterans’ Everyday Battles with Post-traumatic Stress Disorder 6,337
Fear of Twitter: technophobia part 2 6,040
Synesthesia & metaphor — I’m not feeling it 6,036
Understanding Brain Imaging 6,000
The “Best of Anthro 2008” Prizes 5,886
Video Games, Brain and Psychology Round Up 5,752
Talent: A difference that makes a difference 5,532
Silent Raves 5,462
Throwing like a girl(‘s brain) 5,435
The Genetic and Environmental Bases of Addiction 5,297
Trance Captured on Video 5,187
Conferences 5,038
Balance between cultures: equilibrium training 5,000
Girls gone guilty: Evolutionary psych on sex 2 4,899
Life without language 4,877
Jeff Lichtman’s Brainbows 4,654
Encephalon #71: Big Night 4,461
Examples & Theory 4,460
The Encultured Brain: Why Neuroanthropology? Why Now? 4,438
We agree it’s WEIRD, but is it WEIRD enough? 4,398
Tobacco Worse Than Cocaine? 4,227
Poverty Poisons the Brain 4,210
Best of Anthro 4,120
Can Videogames Actually Be Good For You? 3,914
Sleep, Eat, Sex – Orexin Has Something to Say 3,647
Steven Pinker and the Moral Instinct 3,354
Popular Posts 3,287
Exporting American mental illness 3,267
Sex, Lies and IRB Tape: Netporn to SurveyFail 3,263
Web Resources 3,257
Girls closing math gap?: Troubles with intelligence 1 3,235
Chicks dig jerks?: Evolutionary psych on sex 1 3,160
Identical twins not… err… identical? 3,134
Dopamine and Addiction – Part One 3,013
Encephalon #48: The Usual Suspects 2,942
We hate memes, pass it on… 2,917
Is Facebook rotting our children’s brains? 2,886
MMORPG Anthropology: Video Games and Morphing Our Discipline 2,834
Four Stone Hearth #71: Australiana edition 2,815
Get into trance: Felicitas Goodman 2,553
Charlie Rose is on the brain 2,548
Thinking through Claude Lévi-Strauss 2,492
Good Sexual Intercourse Lasts Minutes, Not Hours, Therapists Say 2,480
Brain vs. Philosophy? Howard Gardner Gets Us Across 2,374
Cultural Neuroscience 2,366
How well do we know our brains? 2,357
Stress and Addiction: The Vicious Cycle 2,355
Brain doping poll results in 2,343
Brain School 2,300
Thinking to change your brain: Sharon Begley in the WSJ 2,289
Anthropology and Neuroscience Podcasts 2,268
Decision Making and Emotion 2,245
What makes humans unique? 2,217
Role of Emotions in Brain Function 2,214
Catching Happiness: Christakis and Fowler and the Social Contagion of Behaviors 2,200
The Relevance of Anthropology – Part 1 of the Best of Anthro Blogging 2008 2,190
Colour, is it in the brain? 2,165
Bad brain science: Boobs caused subprime crisis 2,164
The Flynn Effect: Troubles with Intelligence 2 2,147
The Legend of the Crystal Skull 2,094
Culture and Inequality in the Obesity Debate 2,068
The Sex Round Up 2,057
One Day at Kotaku: Understanding Video Games and Other Modern Obsessionss 2,049
Inside the Mind of a Pedophile 2,021
‘Innate’ fear of snakes? 2,011
Gravlee et al: Race, Genetics, Social Inequality and Health 1,997
Caught in the Net – The Internet & Compulsion 1,928
Evolution of altruism: kin selection or affect hunger 1,906
Why Do They Do It? Portrayals of Alcohol on Facebook and MySpace 1,851
Paleofantasies of the perfect diet – Marlene Zuk in the NY Times 1,842
How your brain is not like a computer 1,806
Sympathy for Creationists 1,791
Jean-Pierre Changeux, Gerald Edelman, and How the Mind Works 1,789
Psychiatry affects human psychology: e.g. bipolar children 1,760
Psychopharma-parenting 1,754
Subjectivity and Addiction: Moving Beyond Just the Disease Model 1,742
When Pink Ribbons Are No Comfort: On Humor and Breast Cancer 1,710
Andy Clark & Michael Wheeler: Embodied Cognition and Cultural Evolution 1,710
Righteous Dopefiend by Phillippe Bourgois 1,693
More on Brainbow 1,670
Daphne Merkin: A Journey through Darkness 1,656
Nature/Nurture: Slash To The Rescue 1,642
Raising IQ: Nicholas Kristof Meets Richard Nisbett 1,578
Genetics and Obesity 1,551
The Neural Buddhists of David Brooks 1,485
Equilibrium, modularity, and training the brain-body 1,431
Nature vs. Nurture and Sex: Why the Fight? 1,417
Cabbies’ brains 1,407
 Culture and Learning to Drink: What Age? 1,402
Neuroplasticity on the radio 1,395
Studying Sin 1,390
Hard Drinkers, Meet Soft Science 1,375
SurveyFail redax: Downey adds to Lende 1,375
Red meat, Neandertals were meant to eat it 1,373
Sapir-Whorf hypothesis was right… about adults 1,360